Homemade Spelt Pasta, Proper Ragu and Podcasts

 
 imperia lusso pasta maker

imperia lusso pasta maker

I found this Imperia Lusso pasta maker in a charity shop for £6 and immediately bought it. I have made pasta before with a pasta machine I bought fifteen years ago but I ended up using it only for work with polymer clay so when I saw this Imperia I was excited to get back into the pasta making game.

I am addicted to podcasts and one of my favourite EVER podcasts is Ronna and Beverly, two outspoken fiftysomethings from Boston, who can be seen regularly at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in LA, dispense their unique brand of relationship advice while interviewing/interrogating celebrity guests. This podcast is hilarious and I particularly love lots of their little reference and phrases as I spent a large chunk of my life in Plymouth, Massachusetts. They are also huge anglophiles and even had a series on Sky and perform in London lots and I only hope they come back here soon. They are always great company and were especially so during the making of my ragu and pasta.

 prepping the dough

prepping the dough

 the dough at rest

the dough at rest

I love spelt flour for bread making and pasta as well. The photo above shows two eggs which Imperia suggests adding to 250g of flour but I opted to add a third egg to help bind the spelt flour which I believe was the right decision. I broke the eggs into the middle of a flour bowl and used a fork to blend and mix the flour into the middle until it was blended and then gave it a light kneading, covered it and left it to rest for an hour.

 pasta rolled out into sheets

pasta rolled out into sheets

 from pasta sheets to tagliatelle

from pasta sheets to tagliatelle

I removed a golf ball sized of dough from the rested dough and then divided the rest into three separate balls. I took the golf ball sized ball and flattened it roughly and passed it through the pasta maker several times to remove any bits of dried dough from within. This was after giving the machine a very thorough cleaning with kitchen towel and olive oil. With each of the three balls I roughly flattened it into a rectangular shape, dusted it with a little bit of flour and started with the widest setting and sent it through. I repeated these steps and decreased the width on the machine stopping at the second to thinnest setting. I then let the long sheets as seen above left to rest for 15 minutes and then I sprinkled them with flour and passed them through the tagilatelle setting and let them dry for about an hour.

I brought a big pan of very salted water to the boil and cooked the tagliatelle for 3 minutes. After checking that it was ready I drained and added 3 large serving spoons of my homemade ragu (ragu post coming soon) and mixed this into the pasta. Then I plated up the pasta and added 2 serving spoons of ragu on top of the pasta and drizzled with olive oil and grated with parmagiano. The texture and taste of the pasta combined with the proper ragu made me pledge after the first bite to put the pasta machine to use wherever and whenever possible. Sure it was a bit more effort but it was well worth it.

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